Francine In Retirement
Seeing Life Through Photography

CEE’S FUN FOTO CHALLENGE: CLOUDS

CIRROCUMULUS CLOUDS

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Cirrocumulus clouds are small rounded puffs that usually appear in long rows high in the sky. Cirrocumulus are usually white, but sometimes appear gray. They are the same size or smaller than the width of your littlest finger when you hold up your hand at arm’s length. When these clouds cover a lot of the sky, they can look like the scales of a fish, which is it is called a “mackerel sky.” Cirrocumulus are common in winter and indicate fair, but cold, weather.

ALTOCUMULUS CLOUDS

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Altocumulus clouds are mid-level, grayish-white with one part darker than the other. Altocumulus clouds usually form in groups and are about one kilometer thick. Altocumulus clouds are about as wide as your thumb when you hold up your hand at arm’s length. If you see altocumulus clouds on a warm, humid morning, there might be a thunderstorm by late afternoon.

ALTOSTRATUS CLOUDS

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Altostratus clouds are mid-level, gray or blue-gray clouds that usually covers the whole sky. The Sun or moon may shine through an altostratus cloud, but will appear watery or fuzzy. If you see altostratus clouds, a storm with continuous rain or snow might be on its way. Occasionally, rain falls from an altostratus cloud. If the rain hits the ground, then the cloud has become a nimbostratus.

CUMULUS CLOUDS

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Cumulus clouds have vertical growth. They are puffy white or light gray clouds that look like floating cotton balls. Cumulus clouds have sharp outlines and a flat base at a height of 1000m. They are generally about one kilometer wide which is about the size of your fist or larger when you hold up your hand at arm’s length to look at the cloud. Cumulus clouds can be associated with fair or stormy weather. Watch for rain showers when the cloud’s tops look like cauliflower heads.

STRATUS CLOUDS

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Stratus clouds are low and have a uniform gray in color and can cover most or all of the sky. Stratus clouds can look like a fog that doesn’t reach the ground. Light mist or drizzle is sometimes falling when stratus clouds are in the sky.

HOW CLOUDS ARE FORMED

As air rises it cools and decreases pressure, spreading out. Clouds form when the air cools below the dewpoint, and the air can not hold as much water vapor.

Click on link below to see more clouds.

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BE ENCOURAGED!  BE BLESSED!

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10 Responses to “CEE’S FUN FOTO CHALLENGE: CLOUDS”

  1. A lovely science lesson. 🙂

    janet

  2. A thorough research on the clouds. Thanks for sharing with us. Nice photographs.

  3. Your cloud photos are simply delightful. I’ve always enjoyed the Cirrocumulus clouds.

  4. What a cool picture!

  5. An informative cloud post!

  6. A FUN post about clouds. Thank you for all of the information. Photos are great, too, Francine.
    Blessings ..!!!

  7. Ah, Francine beautiful post! You reminded me of my thesis [ages ago] on the ‘Tower of the Winds’ – in one section I analyzed the types of clouds. I’ve always found clouds fascinating… can sit and watch them for hours!

  8. Hi Francine, I have nominated you for 5 photo- 5stories post challenge. Hope you take the challenge on and if not, no worries. Have a great weekend.
    https://ourrumblingocean.wordpress.com/2015/04/24/five-photos-five-stories-challenge-1-life/


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